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333 West 500 North
Shelbyville, IN, 46176
United States

317-617-2773

America's heritage has stood in the fields and beside farm houses for over a century in the form of barns. Historic barns are becoming more difficult to find, and due to the increase in comercially zoned land are being destroyed. Reclaimed Barns & Beams reclaims the wood from these hand hewed, pinned barns that have stood the tests of time. It is our hope that we can transform this wood into vintage farm tables, chairs, ceiling beams, mantles and more. This will give us a chance to keep the history of these barns alive and with us for years to come.

We Have an Obligation to save  History

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It can be a crowbar, a hammer, or a chainsaw in my hand. I love the work. There is something exciting to me about being in these old barns. You never know what you will find or what someone else will create from what I find. The work is hard, tiring, and so very dirty, but I just love doing it. 

Reclaimed Barns & Beams provides lumber to those who create using historic wood that has a story.
Angie

We Have an Obligation to save History

angela crouse

We Have an Obligation to save History

 

I had to travel to NYC for an overnight work trip. I was so fortunate that 3 friends of mine took me to see “Hamilton” on Broadway; such a wonderful experience. If you get the chance take it.

As I was sitting in the beautiful theater in NYC watching the play, which explained the life and tragic death of Alexander Hamilton, I started thinking about the barns that I have been working with in Indiana.  Those barns were built with lumber that was growing during the end of this time frame, and some were built during the Civil War.  The sets were put together with lumber that was made to look as if it came from the 1700’s. (I have to admit, I was a very bad history student, and I learned more in the three hours I spent at the Broadway production than I did my entire US history class in high school. That has never taken away anything from my love of history or more so heritage. )

During the reclaiming of the barns, I often find myself thinking about that era and how the world looked during that time. What historical event would have been taking place. . . What life must have been like then… Mail delivery, schools, running water, heat… where nothing as they are now. Transportation and shopping took effort and time, something that we don’t consider today. As I sat in the theater watching a play that explained how our country was built, how our government was formed, and the history that took place just a few hundred years ago, I realized how fortunate I am to have such an appreciation for the past. How excited I am to return home to continue the saving of that history so that it can be passed on to future generations.

We cannot travel back to the time of the Revolutionary or Civil War, but we have buildings around us that were built by men and women that walked this country during that time. Men that hid in those barns during those wars... People that fed cattle and built their lives in those barns… We have an obligation to save that history.

And tomorrow I will begin just that as I reclaim yet another barn. It was not built in the 1700’s, but it was built over 80 years ago. And its history is no less important…

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